Online class ~ Dogen: On Personal Transformation

dogen pilgrim

This online class, offered through http://www.EkanZenStudyCenter.org , will explore excerpts from a variety of texts by Zen Master Eihei Dogen, with a particular focus on his teachings regarding the transformational possibilities of Zen practice.

Join Rev. Konin Cardenas for this six week course, which will include the study of brief Zen texts, access to 30 minute pre-recorded lectures, and an hour-long weekly online discussion group. The discussions will be held Tuesday nights from 8:30 – 9:30 pm Eastern/5:30 – 6:30 pm Pacific from January 10th through February 14th, 2017 (6 Classes).

Registration begins on December 1, 2016. To register, simply email konin@ekanzenstudycenter.org. Upon registration, you will receive details on how to access the class materials and online sessions. The online sessions will take place using Zoom technology and can be accessed with video or by phone. Questions or concerns? Don’t hesitate to write.

Like all Ekan ZSC offerings, this class is offered by donation. Please consider the value of the Dharma, the support needs of your sangha, and your financial capacity when making donations. The suggested donation for this class is $10 to $25 per class session. It can be made via PayPal on the ekanzenstudycenter.org site by clicking on the “Donations” link at the top of the home page, or by check or cash.

Investigate your life in 2017 as transformation!

 

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A Pivotal Day

Today is a pivotal day, a turning point in my path of practice. As some of you may have heard, I am taking up the role of Guiding Teacher at Empty Hand Zen Center in New Rochelle, New York. I write this post from the plane, as I travel from California to New York. I’ve packed all of my belongings – the books, altar items, and the clothes of a nun. I’ve sent those things ahead, boxes traveling across the mountains and plains on their way to the eastern shores of the US.

However, even if those things did not arrive at the Zen Center, I’d still have everything I need. For, as the poet Basho so eloquently put it,

I set out on a journey of a thousand leagues, packing no provisions.

That is to say, I meet that which arises in the moment, with a fresh eye, not reliant on the physical supports but on the ability to respond.

I’ve bowed the many bows, given and received many hugs, and even shared some tears with my local Dharma family. It’s a big family – the students, faculty and staff of the Institute of Buddhist Studies, the Graduate Theological Union, the nuns of Aloka Vihara and Karuna Buddhist Vihara, and the residents and students of San Francisco Zen Center and of Berkeley Zen Center. The many streams of Buddhism are related, all part of the Great Ocean, but they need to remain independent of each other in order to nourish the land.

In the end, what does this move mean for you, the readers of Jakuen Zen?

For some it means that you were my local sangha, and are now my long-distance sangha. We continue to practice together, but it will be a practice of staying in tune with each other’s words and voices, more than with each other’s bodies. It may mean that the blog becomes more important, a taste of the teachings of the moment as seen from afar. In a way, reading any sort of dharma is like this. It is a window into another person’s practice. You can look in the window and relate it to your own experience, and you may or may not be living something similar.

For some it’s not much of a change, you were part of the mahasangha (“greater,” as in broader, sangha) and you will continue to be.

For still others, you may find that we are now local sangha, sharing the space between the brick walls of the Zen Center, sitting, standing, or walking. With the local sangha, we will carry out the traditional forms as they find their expression in our particular place and time. Our practice will be inevitably informed by American culture and the English language, but it will also find expression in Latino culture and in Spanish. I hope that we will find the points of contact with tradition to be many and varied. And I’d like to take practice out of the zendo (meditation hall), and into the world through service and dialogue with those who are looking for connection.

EHZC Zendo

Empty Hand Zen Center Zendo

Generally, for everyone, this change means that there will be many more opportunities to practice with me. By taking up the Guiding Teacher role, I am committed to the life of a temple priest –  sitting zazen and chanting daily, offering Dharma talks several times a week, and leading workshops on Zen arts such as sutra copying and gardening.

Given this opportunity for greater focus, I plan to continue writing and to begin to offer online study groups. Please pay a visit to www.ekanzenstudycenter.org for future blog posts and more information about how to study with me.

Finally, I want to share gratitude for my teachers Shosan Victoria Austin and Sekkei Harada Roshi, both of whom have shown unwavering confidence in the Dharma as it expresses itself through me. It is my pleasure to repay the teachings by continuing to share the practice of Zen. I may not be packing any provisions, but I am prepared to pick the fruits and be nourished by them.

Have a look at the latest…

…blog post by Konin on…

www.ekanzenstudycenter.org/blog/

…where you also find information about places in the US where she is teaching.

PS – If you have already signed up on the new site to receive blog posts, thanks! If you haven’t, please consider signing up for the new blog.

 

 

New posts are on the new blog…

…at www.EkanZenStudyCenter.org you will find the latest posts by Konin, an updated teaching schedule, and many more resources.

Check it out!

www.EkanZenStudyCenter.org/blog

Why not have a look?

www.EkanZenStudyCenter.org

Visit www.EkanZenStudyCenter.org for a new blog post

Visit http://www.ekanzenstudycenter.org and sign up to continue following this blog…

Ekan Zen Study Center website

Thanks!

Who’s Effort?

Virya paramita, or the practice of the perfection of effort, is the fourth in a series of six practices of an awakening being. It tends to balance the aspects of wisdom and compassion, and it is in close relationship to the third practice, kshanti, patience or allowing. The subject of effort is one which also relates particularly to the relationship between body and mind.

To further explore this topic, have a listen to this unedited talk, given on Memorial Day 2015 at Empty Hand Zen Center.

The Opportunity of Now

The third topic in this series of six posts about the bodhisattva practices known as the paramitas is kshanti or patience.

deercropped

Overall, I think of kshanti as an aspect that balances the others. Generally one can see the first two paramitas – giving and ethics – as compassion in action, and the last two – meditation and wisdom – as equally expressions of wisdom. Balancing compassion and wisdom, the two broadest areas of Buddhist practice, are the two paramitas in the middle of the list – patience and effort. Effort, or virya, is our topic for next time. For now, I would like to say a few words about kshanti.

Kshanti is the practice of patience. You might say that it has two primary aspects. The first aspect is that of forbearance. This may be closest to its original meaning, when the teaching was developed, around the beginning of the Common Era. This means that when you practice kshanti, you cultivate the ability to endure hardships. You practice being present with even the most difficult things in your life, receiving them in a way that doesn’t reject them or turn away.

This way of practice brings to mind a teaching by Shantideva, the 8th Century Indian sage whose teaching was very encouraging. Shantideva taught, “If you can do something about it (your problem), why be discouraged? If you can’t do something about it, why be discouraged?” One can equally say, either way, why be impatient? Either way, you don’t turn away.

frog in India

The second aspect of kshanti is allowing. That is to say, the patience you are practicing is specifically patience with what is. It is a practice of acknowledging what is, as it is, without judging whether it is good or bad. It is the practice of allowing what is to be what it is.

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And how is it? It is changing, always changing. Nothing remains in one state forever; nothing is permanent. In fact, each moment is a completely new state, the result of innumerable conditions that have arisen and dissolved.

Thus, many centuries after the teaching of kshanti was first expounded, Zen turned it, bringing forth another aspect. Putting the two sides of kshanti together – not turning away from what is, and seeing it as a new expression in each moment – Zen Masters understood that each moment is an opportunity. In deed, each moment is an opportunity to awaken to the true nature of things, to see how your life is teaching you about suffering and freedom from suffering. Each moment is an opportunity to awaken, if you are able to truly be present with what is. This is the opportunity of now.

Seeing it in that light, it’s easy to understand why sitting zazen is so important to Zen practice. For it is in sitting that you find the capacity to encounter your life. It is in zazen that you learn that you can face whatever is in this moment. It is in zazen that you find, again and again, that the opportunity of now is always available.

InstagramCapture_4e3ca6e3-519b-4a10-8a24-d68608f9034b

So I hope to encourage you to practice patience and, to do that, I will  share a quote from Shunryu Suzuki Roshi, the founder of San Francisco Zen Center. “If you become too serious, you will lose your way. If you are just playing a game, you will lose your way. So, little by little, with patience and endurance, we must find our way for ourselves.”

Finally I would add, moment by moment, we do find our way for ourselves. The question is, which way?