Zen Ritual: A Practitioner’s Perspective of the Expressions of Forms

This summer I will be offering a class, at San Francisco Zen Center, that will look at the ways in which each one of us can connect at a profound, personal level with the ceremonies and activities of Zen. It means looking at formal practice from the place of our personal dharma position. That is, the class is about the ways in which ritual relates to us — individually, in community, and from the standpoint of the absolute. So we’ll look at a number of ceremonies over the course of five classes, and talk about these layers of experience and how they deeply inform our practice.
zen_priest
One example of a ritual that we’ll study is the Bodhisattva Vows, which are said at the end of Saturday morning lecture and during the Full Moon ceremony. A typical translation of these vows is:
Beings are numberless, I vow to free them.
Delusions are inexhaustible, I vow to end them.
Dharma Gates are boundless, I vow to enter them.
The Buddha’s Way is unsurpassable, I vow to become it.
We can start to take these vows with the idea of being more skillful in the world, with the support of and engagement with our fellow practitioners. Yet, we can really only take these vows seriously if we understand ourselves as interconnected with all things. So we’ll read a chapter from Shohaku Okumura Roshi’s book, “Living by Vow” in which he writes:

“We cannot be proud of our practice, and we don’t need to be too humble about our lack of practice or understanding. We are just as we are. Our practice is to take one more step toward the infinite, the absolute, moment by moment one step at a time.”

I would add that we are already completely within the infinite in each moment, even though we might feel that we are stepping closer to it. So this is the way in which we will take up the study of ritual this summer. I plan to write a blog entry during each of the five weeks of class, beginning the week of June 23rd, and I hope to hear from each of you about the ways in which you engage with ceremony in your own lives.

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